Millions of people throughout the world have intestinal infections each year. Depending on the strength of their immune system, the infections can be “flu-like” or require medical attention. Infections are usually associated with third world countries but with less oversight funding for federal officials for dairy, poultry and beef, intestinal infections could also increase in the U.S.

Causes for these infections can be from eating contaminated shellfish, undercooked eggs, poultry or meat, spoiled dairy products, or drinking contaminated water. Infections can also be transmitted through the feces. The symptoms for intestinal infections are often nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fever, fatigue and abdominal pain. Good hygiene (washing hands and food) and avoiding foods that irritate the digestive system are recommended.

Infections can be due to yeast (including Candida albicans), bacteria (including Salmonella, Shigella, a small number of toxic Escherichia coli or E. coli, Campylobacter, Clostridium, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus), viruses (including hepatitis A, rotaviruses, enteroviruses, adenoviruses, noroviruses, and astroviruses), various parasites and protozoans (including entamoeba hystolytica, Balantidiasis, Giardia lamblia, Cyrptosporidium, intestinal trichomoniasis) and molds.

With chronic intestinal infections, there is an increase in inflammatory molecules that can damage the gut wall. This produces “leaky gut,” with the toxins and inflammation flowing through the bloodstream to other organs, including the heart and brain.



If you are feeling fatigue, bloating, headaches or nausea, the following are foods and supplements that can reduce the inflammation:

v Broccoli (1),

v Curcumin (often made as curry) (2),

v Ginger (3),

v Mango (4),

v Grapes and grape juice (no alcohol) (5),

v Rosemary (6),

v Sage (7),

v Blackberries (8),

v Chamomile tea (9),

v Garden peas, chickpeas (10),

v Probiotics (11),

v Wild salmon (12).

If you have been feeling increased stress and fatigue, make an appointment with Dr. Steenblock to see if you are overloaded with toxins in the gut. Catching the problem now can help alleviate thousands of dollars’ worth of medical bills later if the infection becomes chronic. Give Dr. Steenblock a call at 1-800-300-1063!



References:


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